Amatala by Maria

Across every decade there lived people in tune with nature, whose hearts were open to the beauty of the forests, trees, animals. She loved trees ever since her baby eyes first recognised them. As she grew, she became slender as the birches, tall and narrow-waisted. Her eyes were brilliant green-blue as the moss that grew under the deebly blue sky. A youth, this was joy to her parents, but not for long.

In her growth to adulthood, she became increasingly worrying as her body started to take up shape of the trees she so loved. Her limbs greened, her hair branched and leaved like a tree in Spring. Bark and shoots grew from her ankles, knees, elbows. Did she fall in love with the elder willow that stood at the edge of her village? Was her desire to become one with it develop into something more? So she lives in the woods now, frightening the village folk with her unusual looks.

Technical notes:

This doll would have hair resembling twigs, I think this can be achieved with brown-coloured mohair glued into dread-like strips. Mossy, leafy hair. The ankles, elbows, knees would have outgrowths like bark, her feet and hands stained light brown and green. In some places, a rougher texture like earth could be done - like soles of her feet, for instance.



The Halo Carrier by Maria

The halo carrier would bring in the halo of the newly appointed angel. It would be sitting heavy on her shoulders and pushing onto her, a disc of brilliant bright, not quite golden. Before the halo gains that weightless complexion you see in paintings, it is a craftsman's object just like anything, only forged in the skies. The halo carrier forged it out of the best materials - the sinless desires, the innocent wishes, the flight of a dove, the aloof nonreactive nature of gold, the tear of a newborn. Each halo would be given a name the craftsman only knows.

The halo carriers (the craftsmen) would be forever carving and forging halos for the angels, themselves limited to the cloudy world of the sky.

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Copyright © 2011 Marina Bychkova.